Reverse Mortgages

The Differences Between a HECM and a HELOC

I previously discussed in earlier posts some of the details and considerations when a senior might be thinking of borrowing equity from their home and they have four options.

  • Refinance their home using a traditional mortgage – There will be a monthly payment
  • Do a Home Equity Line of Credit/HELOC – % only for five years then become fully amortized for remaining 10 years.   There will be a jump in the monthly payment.   “Payment shock”
  • Get a Fixed rate 2nd. Deed of Trust – Fully amortized monthly payment for 15 years.
  • Use a HECM/Home Equity Conversion Mortgage; a “reverse” mortgage.   No payments or loan term.  It is in effect as long as the borrower continues to occupy the home and/or they”pass” away.

Let’s examine the options a little bit closer.  The first three choices all require the borrower to qualify using their income and credit, plus they will have monthly mortgage payments.

Initially, the first 3 options are less expensive in closing costs, but there are risks associated with obligating oneself for a mortgage payment in the later years of their life.

If the borrower is currently employed and plans on working for many more years, then maybe the first 3 choices are ideal.  But what if you want to retire?  The mortgage payments won’t go “away”, the borrower will have to continue to make them each month.

Doing a traditional “cash-out” refinance is certainly an option to consider especially if the existing mortgage is at a high interest rate or it’s an Adjustable Rate Mortgage  ( who knows what will happen with interest rates in the future?  They will probably increase).  And of course, there is a monthly mortgage payment to be made.

Is this a particularly good option for a senior to continue to maintain an ongoing mortgage for many more years?

I will discuss the other three mortgages in my next post and each of them can be appealing depending on the borrower’s circumstances and what they are attempting to accomplish.

 

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Borrow Money from HECM or HELOC?

This is not an easy question to answer because it depends entirely upon the details and circumstances of the potential borrower and what they are trying to achieve.

Whenever anyone is looking to borrow equity from their home they could possibly do a refinance of their existing mortgage and then request cash back at the close of escrow.

Ideally they would be reducing their interest rate on the mortgage they are refinancing and then receiving the extra funds they requested and are happy with their decision.

They will have a mortgage payment to make each month and it might be larger than what they had been previously paying, because they have taken out cash from their equity and increased their loan amount, even if they reduced the interest rate.

The applicant will have to go through a lengthy Underwriting process, have excellent credit, job stability, cash reserves and enough income to meet the “debt to income” ratios and of course  good FICO scores.

This can be a very stressful process as it is more difficult to qualify for traditional mortgages than it was in the past and a great deal of documentation must be “willingly” provided by the applicant to complete the loan process.

And of course, they will have points and fees included in their loan amount as well and depending upon the size of the loan and the interest rate they choose, those fees will vary.

But what if their current loan already has a low interest rate and they want to keep it?

They could consider a Second Trust Deed that would be at a Fixed rate, a Home-Equity-Line-of-Credit or if they are aged 62 or more, a reverse loan/HECM/Home Equity Conversion Mortgage.

Unlike a HELOC, an FHA HECM reverse mortgage will not record in a second position and any existing mortgages on the property will have to be repaid from the funds from the reverse loan.

I will discuss these last two options in my next post.

 

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Buying an Annuity with a Reverse Mortgage

In my previous post, I started a discussion about this topic and why it is never a good idea to use money from a reverse loan to purchase an annuity.

In general, an annuity may have high surrender fees and a deferred payment that tie up the borrower’s funds in an account that they would not have immediate access to and is of no benefit to them.

And why would an 80 year old senior buy one?   What’s the point?  It’s quite likely that they will die before they can ever withdraw any funds from it.

Because of this type of predatory lending, reverse loans developed a nasty image that continues to this day but is no longer true. A reverse mortgage is probably without a doubt the most regulated loan in the lending industry and the safest for the consumer.

At no time is a borrower obligated to buy any insurance products ( especially an annuity) as part of the loan process and within the loan application there are several forms asking the borrower if they intend to use their money from the loan to purchase an annuity and are they working with a retirement advisor?

Once the federal government stepped in and began managing this loan program along with individual state regulations, seniors are now protected from financial manipulation and the potential for financial abuse.

Plus a reverse loan is somewhat “like” an annuity, except the borrower doesn’t have to wait to receive their funds and there are no possible tax consequences.

Why is a HECM/Home Equity Conversion Mortgage better than an annuity?

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Paperwork Needed for a Reverse Loan

I actually discussed this in a previous post, but to change it up a bit and make it more interesting, I created a short video with terrific music that makes it pretty simple to understand what kind of documents are needed from a borrower.

Of course, depending on their personal situation other items might be needed, especially if the borrower is still working, then pay check stubs and W2’s would be needed and any phone numbers for management companies if the borrower lives in a Condo.

Which is always a good idea, but for whatever it’s worth here is the video.

And please….do call me if you have any questions.

 

 

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Reverse Loans for Million Dollar Properties

There are actually two totally different reverse mortgages that are available for seniors to use when they are considering using a Reverse Mortgage to pay off an existing mortgage or simply want additional funds.

Not too many consumers know about the optional “Jumbo” reverse loan that will enable them to receive more of their equity than they would if they used the FHA HECM program, plus it’s less expensive as well.

The FHA Home Equity Conversion Mortgage has a ceiling on the appraised value of a property and it is referred to as the HUD Lending Limit.   Originally this Limit was calculated on a national basis per county, so it varied in the amount of allowable appraised value of a property, county by county with the west coast having the highest limits.

Several years ago HUD eliminated these unfair limits and issued one single amount for the entire country which at this time is $636,150 but I can recall when it was only $362,790 and lower.

It’s considerably higher now, but keep in mind that the actual amount of the reverse loan will use a smaller percentage of the appraised value of the property or the HUD Lending Limit,  ( Whichever is less) than a Conventional loan would use and most often ( Depending upon the age of the borrower) they might receive between 40-70% of the appraised value/Hud Lending Limit.

But if their property is worth 1.1 MM plus, the value will be capped at the HUD Lending Limit and they will not have any of the remaining equity in their property accessible for their use.

This is where the Jumbo Reverse Loan becomes another option, unlocking the rest of the equity in the property to the borrower and enabling them to draw out more money from their home then they could receive under the HECM FHA loan.

I will give the details about this loan in my next post.

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