Reverse Mortgages

Reverse Loans and Second Homes

A reverse loan has more than just one use for a homeowner other than refinancing their residence and it’s beneficial to know that funds from the loan can be used to purchase a property.

Most senior homeowners and Realtors are unaware of this option and could be using it to “downsize” into a smaller property or to purchase the “dream” home a senior may wish to buy in a 55+ community or move to an area of the country that they have always wanted to live in.

Another terrific option is to purchase a Vacation home.

Everyone often dreams about having a cabin, a beach house, a home on a lake or some other wonderful property that allows them to enjoy themselves and have fun and quite often, make it a family destination  for vacations and family reunions.

If qualifying for  mortgage payments using income and credit isn’t realistic  on a second property isn’t possible, why not use the equity in one’s residence to complete the purchase and possibly pay “all in cash” for the dream home and not have payments on it, and no payments on the reverse loan because they are not required.

How perfect is that? Two homes without mortgage payments.

How is this possible you are thinking?   Contact me to find out and possibly acquire that vacation home you have always wanted.

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Reverse Loans and Bad Credit

In general having derogatory credit is less of an issue for being approved on a reverse loan than it would be on traditional financing.

The reverse loan applicant does undergo some “light” credit Underwriting to determine their residual income after all housing obligations are paid and this would also include any revolving or installment debts as well.

The underwriting process is referred to in the industry as the Financial Assessment and was put into place within the last few years, providing an overview of the borrowers financial capacity and willingness to continue making any on going payment obligations after the reverse loan has funded and closed.

FICO scores are not used to determine an individual eligibility for the loan, but if there are any late payments on an existing mortgage and other obligations, a letter of explanation must be provided along with the necessary documentation to support it.

But what if one had had a bankruptcy? Can they still be approved for the loan or not? The short answer is “yes”.

Chapter 7 Bankruptcies must be dismissed or discharged prior to closing the new loan. If it was dismissed over one year ago, no additional documentation is required.

But if it was less than one year, the borrower must provide a court order signed by the judge as proof of the discharge or dismissal along with the discharge schedule.

Chapter 13 Bankruptcies have a couple of options.

The borrower pays the bankruptcy in full at the close of Escrow.  And obtain a payoff letter from the trustee.

The borrower must pay off any liens against the property and any federal debt.

The court must provide written permission signed by the judge indicating that the borrower does not need to pay off the bankruptcy to proceed with the reverse mortgage. This permission must specify that the mortgage may be an adjustable rate mortgage, if applicable.

Chapter 11 Bankruptcies are most prominently used by businesses and have similar guidelines as a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy.

This is a brief description about what the lending process is and what must take place in order to approve a reverse loan for a borrower who has had credit problems in the past.   But do contact me if you have any questions.

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Stopping a Foreclosure

Can a reverse loan be used to stop a foreclosure on a seniors property? Yes, it can but it must meet the other loan requirements per the lender.

Sadly, some senior homeowners have found themselves unable to keep up with their mortgage payments or property taxes because of unexpected events such as a health crisis or a major repair to their home and they end up falling behind on their payments, triggering a foreclosure.

If they are not too deep into the process and apply for a reverse loan, there is a good possibility that it can be stopped and they won’t lose their home.

Here is what a reverse mortgage lender will need in regards to the foreclosure from the potential borrower.

  •  Proof of foreclosure and the dates associated with it.
  •  A letter from the attorney handling the foreclosure confirming that the payoff is not a short pay.
  • Confirmation that the borrower is still occupying the property
  •  Confirmation that the borrower is still the legal, vested owner of the property.
  •  Confirmation that the Sheriff’s sale has not taken place, OR that the borrower is still within the redemption period AND vested in title.
  • The borrower must provide a letter of explanation describing what happened to them and what steps they took to avoid having a foreclosure.

Documentation must be provided by the borrower for the reason they fell into foreclosure, which could have been due to income loss, large and unexpected medical expenses or other viable reasons.

This is a very simple overview about using a reverse loan to stop a foreclosure that is in process, however there are additional qualifications regarding “residual” income , the amount that is “owed” and if there is enough remaining equity in the property to complete the transaction.

Please contact me for more details and/or a quote and I will answer any questions about the process and what you need to know.

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Seniors Seeking Additional Money

I have been sharing different ideas in my last couple of posts about the options for a senior if they want to borrower equity out of their home and whether or not they are a good or ideal solution to solve a financial problem or simply wanting extra funds to be available to them for any use.

I’m going to continue this discussion in this post and one more that will follow it in a few days.

In the last couple of days, I talked about the traditional HELOC, the one that every Bank offers to their customers and now  let’s pick up where I left off.

The HELOC will allow interest only payments for the first 5 years, but then will adjust to a much larger payment. Plus, the lender at any time can “freeze” the account and the funds in it will not be available to the borrower.

Too often the borrower is unaware that the loan will be “reset” in the future and if they no longer have the same income as they did when they initiated the transaction, they may not be able to afford the new and higher payment.

Sometimes a senior will use one of these loans for additional income to pay on going expenses, but obviously they will eventually run out of money in the HELOC and of course, will have mortgage payments for the term of the loan.

This can be disastrous for a senior and possibly result in them losing their home through foreclosure if they are unable to afford the payments.

The next possible choice, would be to do a traditional fixed rate 2nd Trust Deed. At least you will know what the payment will be each month, but again the borrower is obligating themselves to a mortgage payment for 15 years and they may not have the income in the future to continue comfortably making the payment each month.

And if they are a senior and or hoping and or planning to retire within a few years, will they be able to afford this obligation every, single month?

So would be the next choice?

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Reverse Loans and Divorcing

In my previous post I mentioned that since the 1990’s, “Gray” divorce  ( As senior divorce is often referred to) has increased.   As a matter of fact it has tripled and more seniors are splitting up than in any previous time.

More often than not, the “wife” will want to continue to live in the home but is unable to qualify for a traditional loan due to lack of income and cash reserves.

So what happens if one of them wants to keep the home and continue to live in it?

More than likely they won’t have enough income to qualify for a traditional loan and even if they are going to receive spousal support, a lender will not use it for qualifying purposes because there will be no history of it’s receipt to the spouse who has been awarded support.

And what would be her option?

Depending on her age, the value of the subject property and if there are any mortgages on it, she may be able to qualify for a reverse mortgage, pay off the spouse and continue to live in her home.

Her only responsibilities would be to continue to pay property taxes, home insurance and any HOA fees and keep the home in good repair.

Reverse loans are a financial tool.  A tool to leverage the longevity of a retirement portfolio, purchase a home, provide additional income for on going expenses and other aging concerns.

And it’s also an excellent tool that can help the pain of divorce be just a little bit less and allow one of the divorcing couples to remain living in their home and not be displaced.

My description is quite simplistic in this post and the borrower does need to qualify on their residual income, but overall using a Reverse mortgage as part an option to retain the property in a divorce is a very good suggestion and should be considered in the settlement process.

 

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