running out of money

The Costs of Care Giving

As the Boomer population ages and the reality begins to loom that at some point they may need someone to provide them with “care giving” but no one wants to talk about this possibility happening to them.

But as we age and I’m going to be 72 myself  ( Yikes, when did that happen?) our bodies are going to start to give us trouble as we begin our slide down the slope of aging and at some point, we may need help.

Ideally the Boomer generation has taken better care of themselves then our own parents did and we certainly are much more active than their generation who smoked, didn’t exercise and had high fat diets.

But at the least, they didn’t have as much stress in their lives as we seem to have in our’s and their generation lived a much slower daily pace compared to the hectic lifestyles so many of us have in this period of time.

Hopefully those of you who are reading this post and are of a “certain age”, will manage to dodge falling apart and having to rely on a care giver.   But what happens if you need one and you don’t have Long-Term-Care Insurance?

Medicare will not pay for this service in case you were under the impression it would, you have to pay for it.

You will have to rely on your own retirement funds if you happen to have any and pay a professional care giver or rely on family members to take care of you.   And that’s a terrible option.

There are two kinds of “costs” in this equation, the actual monthly expense that can run $4000 or more each month while you are helpless or the physiological  and turmoil and burden to your family members who will be overwhelmed by the responsibly of taking care of you.

And if you don’t have enough funds to cover this expense, it will be up to your children to pay for it and in many family situations, the adult children will fight among one another and it typically will fall to one of the children to pay for all the expenses and also to attend to your needs.  And the one’s who refuse to help in any capacity, will disappear.

As for paying for the care of a professional, licensed and Bonded care giver that expense could be paid by the funds from a reverse loan and it will become a safe and valuable option for money to cover the costs and relieve the adult children from using their own funds to pay for your care.

It’s something to think about, utilize one’s equity to pay for your own needs and not rely on your adult children and keep your dignity and keep your family intact.

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Reverse Loans and Bad Credit

In general having derogatory credit is less of an issue for being approved on a reverse loan than it would be on traditional financing.

The reverse loan applicant does undergo some “light” credit Underwriting to determine their residual income after all housing obligations are paid and this would also include any revolving or installment debts as well.

The underwriting process is referred to in the industry as the Financial Assessment and was put into place within the last few years, providing an overview of the borrowers financial capacity and willingness to continue making any on going payment obligations after the reverse loan has funded and closed.

FICO scores are not used to determine an individual eligibility for the loan, but if there are any late payments on an existing mortgage and other obligations, a letter of explanation must be provided along with the necessary documentation to support it.

But what if one had had a bankruptcy? Can they still be approved for the loan or not? The short answer is “yes”.

Chapter 7 Bankruptcies must be dismissed or discharged prior to closing the new loan. If it was dismissed over one year ago, no additional documentation is required.

But if it was less than one year, the borrower must provide a court order signed by the judge as proof of the discharge or dismissal along with the discharge schedule.

Chapter 13 Bankruptcies have a couple of options.

The borrower pays the bankruptcy in full at the close of Escrow.  And obtain a payoff letter from the trustee.

The borrower must pay off any liens against the property and any federal debt.

The court must provide written permission signed by the judge indicating that the borrower does not need to pay off the bankruptcy to proceed with the reverse mortgage. This permission must specify that the mortgage may be an adjustable rate mortgage, if applicable.

Chapter 11 Bankruptcies are most prominently used by businesses and have similar guidelines as a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy.

This is a brief description about what the lending process is and what must take place in order to approve a reverse loan for a borrower who has had credit problems in the past.   But do contact me if you have any questions.

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Stopping a Foreclosure

Can a reverse loan be used to stop a foreclosure on a seniors property? Yes, it can but it must meet the other loan requirements per the lender.

Sadly, some senior homeowners have found themselves unable to keep up with their mortgage payments or property taxes because of unexpected events such as a health crisis or a major repair to their home and they end up falling behind on their payments, triggering a foreclosure.

If they are not too deep into the process and apply for a reverse loan, there is a good possibility that it can be stopped and they won’t lose their home.

Here is what a reverse mortgage lender will need in regards to the foreclosure from the potential borrower.

  •  Proof of foreclosure and the dates associated with it.
  •  A letter from the attorney handling the foreclosure confirming that the payoff is not a short pay.
  • Confirmation that the borrower is still occupying the property
  •  Confirmation that the borrower is still the legal, vested owner of the property.
  •  Confirmation that the Sheriff’s sale has not taken place, OR that the borrower is still within the redemption period AND vested in title.
  • The borrower must provide a letter of explanation describing what happened to them and what steps they took to avoid having a foreclosure.

Documentation must be provided by the borrower for the reason they fell into foreclosure, which could have been due to income loss, large and unexpected medical expenses or other viable reasons.

This is a very simple overview about using a reverse loan to stop a foreclosure that is in process, however there are additional qualifications regarding “residual” income , the amount that is “owed” and if there is enough remaining equity in the property to complete the transaction.

Please contact me for more details and/or a quote and I will answer any questions about the process and what you need to know.

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What is MIP and PMI?

In my previous post I described what IMIP is in regards to Reverse mortgages and that it is one of the fees listed as a Closing Cost for all borrowers.

Let’s pick up where I left off in the earlier post.

The other benefit to paying this insurance premium, is that in the event and if for any reason the Lender who is servicing the borrower’s Line of Credit should cease to exist and or are unable to provide funds to the borrower from their Line-of-Credit, the borrower is protected, because their loan and funds in the LOC are insured by FHA.

Any money left in the borrowers account will continue to be available to them regardless of whether or not the company servicing their loan continues to exist.

The IMIP protects the borrower, their funds in the Line-of-Credit and the heirs to the estate and that’s very reassuring and beneficial to everyone who has a reverse loan and to their family.

Sometimes the consumer is confused about what MIP and PMI are and there is a difference between them.   PMI is used in conventional mortgage financing whenever a borrower will have less than 80% in equity.

This is typically seen when someone is buying a home and coming in with a small down payment.   PMI protects the Lender in the event the borrower ceases to make mortgage payments on their loan and there is a foreclosure.   PMI gives the Lender some protection by having the loan insured against this possibility.

PMI is for traditional financing and IMIP is for FHA government insured loans.

And there you have it.

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Reverse Loan Fees

Fees or “costs” for a reverse mortgage are identical to what the fees are for traditional real estate loans, with a couple of exceptions and I’m going to discuss one of those exceptions in this post.

I discussed this topic previously, but I thought that I would go into more detail about the IMIP that is always charged on FHA loans and just what it is, because it is the most expensive but important fee that is charged on all reverse mortgages.

Reverse loans never have a required mortgage payment and there is no loan term to be concerned about, but the interest that is owed each month on it will compound over the life of the loan and one of the important purposes of the Initial Mortgage Insurance Premium / IMIP is to guarantee that no matter how much is owed when the loan becomes due  ( the death of the last borrower and or the estate selling the home), they can never owe more than the present value of the property.

In other words, if the loan is larger than what the property is worth, the IMIP will pay the difference, not the borrower or their heirs.   They are completely protected and not liable for the repayment of any funds that exceed the current value of the property.

This is referred to as a “Non-Recourse” mortgage.

 

 

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