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Reverse Loan Choices

Most of the reverse loans that are originated are the FHA HECM program and over the years has been the “workhorse” for allowing seniors to utilize their home’s equity without having to qualify for a mortgage payment.

And as of this post, that continues to be the most commonly used reverse mortgage, however, in the last few years, another option has become available to seniors, especially those who have expensive properties at one million dollars or more.

The FHA HECM loan has a cap on the value of the subject property   ( As of 2018) of $679,650 and the new loan will use that as the maximum appraised value, a percentage of “that” and the youngest borrower’s age to determine the amount of money the senior will receive at the close of escrow.

But what if you want more money than it will provide or you have a large mortgage you want to be paid off, but the funds in the HECM are insufficient to achieve this goal?

A Jumbo proprietary reverse mortgage might be the solution because the loan will consider properties valued as much as 6MM and as low as $700,000 and the interest rates are “fixed”.   An additional benefit would be if someone lives in a Condo that is not on the approved FHA Condo list (That means they cannot do a HECM), a proprietary Jumbo reverse loan is the answer to this common problem.

An additional benefit to using this loan is that the Closing Costs are less than the FHA HECM because the borrower is not being charged the MIP insurance premium that all FHA loans require.   And some are not charging an Origination fee, making the loan much more inexpensive to the borrower in comparison to the  HECM.

As more lenders are offering Jumbo reverse loans and the industry evolves to meet the demand for them, I am sure that there will be new programs and opportunities for seniors to access the equity in their homes into the future making their retirement years more affordable and comfortable.

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Decision Making and Fears

I think it tends to be human nature in that for some people, they hesitate to make a decision for just about everything that requires one.   Whether it is getting married or maybe divorced, having children, taking a leap at a new career or choosing a paint color for their house.

And it’s prudent not to blindly rush into anything, you should be well informed before making decisions that are especially crucial to your life.

Most of the time these decisions are minor, but what about the ones that are not and could potentially have a huge impact on your life and future?

Sometimes this hesitation comes from looking for the best price for something if you are considering doing a large purchase, but other times it comes from a place of being worried about the possibility of making a “wrong” decision.

Or not being educated enough about whatever it is you are considering.  So, you put off making any decision about it indefinitely.

A good question to ask yourself is, “what is the worst thing that could happen if I make a decision and it turns out to be awful?”   Asking yourself that question can potentially take away your fear and help you to move forward.

However, hesitating or waiting can continue for a very long time and it can be costly.    And what is the “cost’ of waiting?

If you are hesitating in learning about reverse loans because you have heard “bad things” about them, why are you allowing yourself to be influenced by other’s opinions that generally are incorrect instead of doing some research with a professional?

What is this inertia costing you every month that you wait to find out how much money you could possibly receive from the HECM loan?

It’s fear.

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There Are a lot of Boomers

10,000 Americans each day are turning 62 and few of them have any funds saved for retirement and those that do, are underfunded in their retirement portfolios and they may not have enough funds to protect them as they grow older and face medical expenses due to aging and other unplanned life events.

I feel that the FHA and proprietary reverse loans will become part of everyone’s retirement plan, because a home is a senior’s greatest assist and why not use the equity in it to pay for unplanned expenses and still be able to remain in their home?

Seniors will start to see that by using a reverse loan to assist in funding their retirement as a viable option to protect them from drawing down on their retirement funds too often and also potentially avoid tax consequences such as paying Capital Gains on any withdrawals.

It’s an obvious and safe solution and should not be overlooked by any senior homeowner and they owe it to themselves to consider the loan as a possible solution allowing them to eliminate their concerns, age in place and not be afraid to consider its use as a possible solution to remaining financially secure.

http://reverseloanmoney.com

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The Costs of Care Giving

As the Boomer population ages and the reality begins to loom that at some point they may need someone to provide them with “care giving” but no one wants to talk about this possibility happening to them.

But as we age and I’m going to be 72 myself  ( Yikes, when did that happen?) our bodies are going to start to give us trouble as we begin our slide down the slope of aging and at some point, we may need help.

Ideally the Boomer generation has taken better care of themselves then our own parents did and we certainly are much more active than their generation who smoked, didn’t exercise and had high fat diets.

But at the least, they didn’t have as much stress in their lives as we seem to have in our’s and their generation lived a much slower daily pace compared to the hectic lifestyles so many of us have in this period of time.

Hopefully those of you who are reading this post and are of a “certain age”, will manage to dodge falling apart and having to rely on a care giver.   But what happens if you need one and you don’t have Long-Term-Care Insurance?

Medicare will not pay for this service in case you were under the impression it would, you have to pay for it.

You will have to rely on your own retirement funds if you happen to have any and pay a professional care giver or rely on family members to take care of you.   And that’s a terrible option.

There are two kinds of “costs” in this equation, the actual monthly expense that can run $4000 or more each month while you are helpless or the physiological  and turmoil and burden to your family members who will be overwhelmed by the responsibly of taking care of you.

And if you don’t have enough funds to cover this expense, it will be up to your children to pay for it and in many family situations, the adult children will fight among one another and it typically will fall to one of the children to pay for all the expenses and also to attend to your needs.  And the one’s who refuse to help in any capacity, will disappear.

As for paying for the care of a professional, licensed and Bonded care giver that expense could be paid by the funds from a reverse loan and it will become a safe and valuable option for money to cover the costs and relieve the adult children from using their own funds to pay for your care.

It’s something to think about, utilize one’s equity to pay for your own needs and not rely on your adult children and keep your dignity and keep your family intact.

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Reverse Loans and Bad Credit

In general having derogatory credit is less of an issue for being approved on a reverse loan than it would be on traditional financing.

The reverse loan applicant does undergo some “light” credit Underwriting to determine their residual income after all housing obligations are paid and this would also include any revolving or installment debts as well.

The underwriting process is referred to in the industry as the Financial Assessment and was put into place within the last few years, providing an overview of the borrowers financial capacity and willingness to continue making any on going payment obligations after the reverse loan has funded and closed.

FICO scores are not used to determine an individual eligibility for the loan, but if there are any late payments on an existing mortgage and other obligations, a letter of explanation must be provided along with the necessary documentation to support it.

But what if one had had a bankruptcy? Can they still be approved for the loan or not? The short answer is “yes”.

Chapter 7 Bankruptcies must be dismissed or discharged prior to closing the new loan. If it was dismissed over one year ago, no additional documentation is required.

But if it was less than one year, the borrower must provide a court order signed by the judge as proof of the discharge or dismissal along with the discharge schedule.

Chapter 13 Bankruptcies have a couple of options.

The borrower pays the bankruptcy in full at the close of Escrow.  And obtain a payoff letter from the trustee.

The borrower must pay off any liens against the property and any federal debt.

The court must provide written permission signed by the judge indicating that the borrower does not need to pay off the bankruptcy to proceed with the reverse mortgage. This permission must specify that the mortgage may be an adjustable rate mortgage, if applicable.

Chapter 11 Bankruptcies are most prominently used by businesses and have similar guidelines as a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy.

This is a brief description about what the lending process is and what must take place in order to approve a reverse loan for a borrower who has had credit problems in the past.   But do contact me if you have any questions.

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